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Eyre Peninsula Camping

South Australia has some truly incredible coastline, and we’ve thoroughly enjoyed exploring the Eyre Peninsula camping options over the last couple of months. In this post, we share with you the camp sites that we’ve stayed at. You should know we really tried to find the best of the best, whilst avoiding some rather windy and cold weather along the way.

We skipped a heap of caravan parks as they aren’t usually our thing, but this post covers a huge number of truly amazing camp sites on the Eyre Peninsula.

Eyre Peninsula Camping

Camping on the Eyre Peninsula includes some truly sensational spots, like this at Carrow Wells

Scotts Beach

Our first couple of nights on the Eyre Peninsula were spent at Scotts Beach, in the Conservation Park camp ground. We really enjoyed this spot, with the camp grounds behind the dunes, stunning coastline and lots of places that you can hop in your 4WD to travel to.

We caught a couple of decent salmon here off the beach, enjoyed magic coastline and spent the better part of a day heading into Fowlers Bay, doing the 4WD tracks through the dunes and out to Point Fowler, before driving back along Scotts Bay to the camp site.

  • Cost: $13.50 per vehicle per night, plus the parks access
  • Amenities: A drop toilet
  • Style of camping permitted: All types, although a 4WD opens your options considerably
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Online at the SA parks website
Scotts Beach is stunning

Scotts Beach is a stunning camping location

Camped behind the dunes

You can camp behind the dunes for some protection

Wittelbee Conservation Park

After a reasonably big day stocking up in Ceduna (after we had to dispose of any fruit or vegetables at the crossing), we were very glad of a nice little camp site not too far away in the Wittelbee Conservation Park.

There’s a number of places you can camp here, with some being right on the beach, and others being on the edge of little cliffs. We had a great night overlooking one of the bays, and thoroughly enjoyed it.

  • Cost: $13.50 per night per vehicle
  • Amenities: Nothing
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Online at the SA parks website
Camping at Wittelbee

Amazing views from camp at Wittelbee

Camped at Wittelbee Conservation Park

Wittelbee Conservation Park is a great place to kick back

Point Brown

If you love free camping, Point Brown has your name written all over it. Located at the end of a good condition gravel road, you have a number of places that are available to camp at. A 4WD is required to access a number of these places, although you would sneak a 2WD in to some of them.

We spent the afternoon catching king George whiting and tommy ruffs, and then sat around a fire in the evening. Unfortunately we were chased out the next morning by mosquitoes that were absolute insane, but it was an amazing camp site asides from this.

  • Cost: Completely free
  • Amenities: Nothing
  • Style of camping permitted: All types, but a 4WD is recommended
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: No bookings required; first in best dressed with a lot of different camping options
Camped at Point Brown

Some of the best views we’ve had free camping

Point Brown Free camping

Camped on a hill, just above the beach

Perlubie Beach

One of the most well known camp grounds in South Australia is Perlubie Beach, near Streaky Bay. The rules have recently changed here, with numbers capped, online booking required and marked out camping bays.

Perlubie Beach is stunning when its good weather, and absolutely amazing for young kids with shallow water to kick around in all day.

You need to be self sufficient here, and contain your own grey water too.

  • Cost: $15 per night
  • Amenities: One public toilet, plus rubbish bins
  • Style of camping permitted: Beach camping. 4WD recommended. Grey water collection and toilet required
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Online at the Streaky Bay shire website
Perlubie Beach Sunset

The sunsets at Perlubie Beach are often beautiful

Perlubie Beach in SA

Beach front camping at its best

Gawler Ranges National Park

On our way to the Flinders Ranges, we called in at the Gawler Ranges National Park for a couple of days, and had a heap of fun. It’s a nice inland spot with a huge amount of land and history. We did a number of the walks which were pretty good, and thoroughly enjoyed the 4WD Track around the park.

  • Cost: $13.50 per vehicle per night, plus the parks access
  • Amenities: Drop toilet, fire pits
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Online at the SA parks website
Yandinga campground

Our camp site in the Gawler Ranges National Park

Hiking in the Gawler Range

The Gawler Ranges National Park has some magnificent hikes

Fitzgerald Bay

Just north of Whyalla lies a stunning area known as Fitzgerald Bay. You can get to this from Point Lowly, or drive in along the bitumen. The Fitzgerald Bay has a huge number of different places where you can camp, overlooking the amazing bay and the fish farms.

It’s completely free, and as long as the area is looked after it should remain this way. We spent a couple of great nights here at Queen B, camped on the rocks and just metres from the water. Whilst it wasn’t swimming weather (raining on and off our entire stay and quite cold), it is super picturesque and would make for a a great camp site.

  • Cost: Completely free
  • Amenities: None
  • Style of camping permitted: All types, with multiple camp sites. When its wet the emergency track is not suitable for 2WD vehicles
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: No booking possible. First in, best dressed
Fitzgerald Bay Camping

Camped at Queen B on Fitzgerald Bay

Amazing camp

This is a magic part of the world, and its completely free

Whyalla Caravan and Tourist Park

After getting tired of trying to head into town, stock up, empty toilets, fill up with water and grab whatever else we need before heading out again, we took the easy way out and booked a couple of nights at Whyalla Caravan and Tourist Park.

We’re not really caravan park people, but this is a great park that is very obviously run by people who really care about its reputation. We had an easy couple of days, grabbed what we needed before heading out further along the Eyre Peninsula.

  • Cost: $30 for powered sites for two people, with kids over 4 being an extra $5 per night
  • Amenities: Full, normal caravan park amenities excluding a pool and jumping pillow
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: No
  • How to book: Online on their website, or you can ring them on 8645 9357
Camped at Whyalla

Our camp site at Whyalla Caravan Park

Caravan sites at Whyalla

It’s a well priced, and really well cared for place

Point Gibbon

If you are after a heap of different places to camp, the coastline between Cowell and Point Gibbon has a heap of camp sites. Point Gibbon itself is an online booking system though, so don’t get caught out like we did. This is a formal camp site with toilets and great views, and its a pretty amazing spot with good weather.

  • Cost: $20 per site, per night
  • Amenities: Flushing toilets, a shelter and would you believe, but WIFI?!
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Book online on the Eyre Peninsula website (camps between Cowell and Point Gibbon are a cash in envelope system at the pay stations)
Point Gibbon Camp site

Sunset over Point Gibbon Campground

Point Gibbon Camping

It’s a decent place to stay, and you have a guaranteed booking

Carrow Wells

If you want white beaches, crystal clear and turquoise water (although cold as!), you can’t go past Carrow Wells. This is a donation camp and you can stay in a number of places (some really close to the water), and we rated this as one of our favourite camp sites in South Australia.

Our site was a tiny walk down onto the beach, where we splashed, fished, snorkeled, walked and just relaxed for two days with great weather.

  • Cost: Donation camp; pay what you feel its worth (don’t leave without dropping something in!)
  • Amenities: Nothing
  • Style of camping permitted: All types, but big rigs or those with limited clearance will have a hard time
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: First come, best dressed; no bookings
Carrow wells accessibility

Carrow Wells was one of our favourite camps on the Eyre Peninsula

Tucked into Carrow Wells

Camped metres from the beach with our Reconn R2

Red Cliff Beach

Further south lies Red Cliff Beach, which we spent a night at and though it was pretty good. We had feral weather on our stay, but there’s a couple of beaches you can get onto, with great options for fishing and some nice views.

  • Cost: Completely free
  • Amenities: No amenities
  • Style of camping permitted: All styles
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: No booking; first come, first served
Red Cliff Beach

Red Cliff beach is a beautiful place to spend a few nights

Camped at Red Cliff

We had shocking weather here, but still enjoyed it

Moonlight Bay

Not far away from Port Lincoln lies Moonlight Bay; another great, free camp on the Eyre Peninsula. This has a number of places you can camp near the water, and the views are quite spectacular. Our kids thoroughly enjoyed splashing around in the water and exploring the rocks, and we rated this as one of the best free camps on the Eyre Peninsula.

  • Cost: Completely free
  • Amenities: No amenities
  • Style of camping permitted: All types, although 4WD’s have much better options
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: No bookings; first come, first served.
Camped at Moonlight Bay

The camping at Moonlight Bay was awesome, especially considering its free

Camp sites at Moonlight Bay

There’s lots of places to pull in and camp

Bayview Park

After finding new owners had taken over Bayview Park in Port Lincoln, we were super excited to spend some time there. It’s cheap, is run by great owners, has amazing views over Port Lincoln and is a short drive to everything you need. We ended up staying for 4 nights here while we caught up with family and did some odds and ends, and highly rate it.

  • Cost: $15 per site per night, plus $5 per night if you want showers and toilets
  • Amenities: Toilets and showers if you pay, and rubbish bins
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Talk to the owner in season
  • How to book: No bookings required; arrive and use the envelopes to pay
Bayview Park, Port Lincoln

Incredible views of the entire Port Lincoln region

Lots of rain at Bayview

We got smashed by rain here but totally loved it

Fisherman Point

Our first night in the Lincoln National Park was at Fisherman Point, and we were quite impressed with the camp site. Its been upgraded, but some of the camp sites have great views over the bay, and we enjoyed the company of lots of little birds, plus great sunsets and good weather.

  • Cost: $20 per site, per night
  • Amenities: Drop toilets x 2
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Online on the SA parks website
Zero complaints about the views

Our camp site at Fisherman Point was really good

Fisherman Point camp 14

It’s hard to complain about this place

Horse Rock

Not far after entering Lincoln National Park you’ll drive past Horse Rock Camp Ground, which we chose for a night when the weather was turning around. You can get razor fish off the shore here, and we grabbed a couple (although they were fairly small!).

The camp site is less picturesque than Fisherman Point, but still nice.

  • Cost: $20 per night per site, or $28 for up to 14 people, or $36 for up to 21 people
  • Amenities: None
  • Style of camping permitted: Anything with a bit of clearance. Only some sites are suitable for large rigs
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Online on the SA Parks website
Horse Rock camping

We booked the largest site and had 3 campers and vehicles stay

Horse Rock Camping

The views are not as nice as other parts of the Lincoln National Park, but its still good

Engine Point

If you wanted an easy to get to camp site with some privacy, and spectacular views you can’t go past Engine Point South camp ground in the Lincoln National Park. You can literally camp on grass, an overlook a pristine bay.

It’s a short walk to a beach, you can fish right off the rocks and is really scenic, and one of the cheaper camp sites in the park.

  • Cost: $13.50 per night per site
  • Amenities: None
  • Style of camping permitted: All types, with some being 4WD suitable only
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Online on the SA Parks website
Engine Point views

Engine Point was a huge surprise for us

Engine Point views are great

When the sun comes out this is one of the best camp sites in the Lincoln National Park

September Beach

One of the older camp grounds in the Lincoln National Park is September Beach, which we spent two nights at to escape the high winds from the West. We had direct beach access (down a steep dune), and thought September Beach was really picturesque. The camp sites are large, and despite the amenities being quite dated its a great place.

  • Cost: $20 per site per night, or $28 for up to 14 people, or $36 for up to 21 people
  • Amenities: Drop toilets, picnic areas
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Online on the SA Parks website
September beach is truly magic

The water colour at September Beach is something else

Hunkered down at September Beach

Our camp site at September Beach

Memory Cove

Our favourite camp site in the Lincoln National Park by a country mile was Memory Cove, which requires a fair bit more effort to get to, and a 4WD. We spent 3 amazing nights here with more little wrens about than I’ve seen anywhere.

There are only 5 camp sites here, with a private beach to access, some nice walks, lots of scenery and heaps of shade. This was a really relaxing and peaceful camp ground, and completely worth the long, rough track in.

  • Cost: $29.50 per site, per night
  • Amenities: Drop toilet
  • Style of camping permitted: 4WD only, and tents, or small campers
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: No, not ever
  • How to book: Online, on the SA parks website
Memory Cove Camping

Memory Cove was one of our favourite places in South Australia

Memory Cove Beach

The cove itself is truly awesome

Mikkira Station

Having never seen a Koala in the wild before, we were super excited to hear that Mikkira Station was staying open for a bit longer, and we were lucky enough to spend a night here. This is not far from Port Lincoln, is easy to access and you can camp amongst the Koalas in the wild.

I assumed we might see a couple, but we saw at least 30, and with minimal effort. We camped in a big open area that had about 4 within 10 metres of our camper trailer, and we could hear them, see them and smell them.

We saw them fight, jump, make loud noises and even come down onto the ground at night, and during the day, and it was really special for our young kids and even the adults.

  • Cost: $30 per night per site
  • Amenities: Flushing toilets and hot showers
  • Style of camping permitted: All types, but this is closed during the peak fire ban season
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Book online, or call 0447 373 811
Our camp at Mikkira

Camped at Mikkira station at the end of the season

Right next to a Koala

The Koala experiences we had on this property were as good as they get

Yangie Bay

In Coffin Bay National Park your options for camping with a big rig are fairly limited, and we booked a night at Yangie Bay to explore. The camp grounds here are pretty decent, but the bay isn’t really suitable for swimming, its fairly busy and its certainly not very picturesque.

We left the following day to head out to Black Springs, but if you want to base yourself in the National Park Yangie Bay is decent.

  • Cost: $20 per site per night, or $28 for up to 14 people and two vehicles
  • Amenities: Drop toilets, picnic area
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season in the communal fire pit
  • How to book: Online at the SA parks website
Yangie Bay Campground

Yangie Bay Campground is the most popular in Coffin Bay National Park

Beautiful Golden Island

A visit to Golden Islands from Yangie Bay is so worth doing

Black Springs

After confirming that we’d be able to tow our hybrid camper out to Black Springs the previous day, we hooked up early in the morning and headed out with low tyre pressures. The drive from Yangie is fairly easy, with exception of a couple of sandy sections, and you are at the mercy of any big tides.

We chose to camp at Black Springs Overflow, and had the whole place to ourselves, on the edge of a beautiful cliff, paying much less than Yangie Bay and with no one around to bother us. We really enjoyed our spot at Black Springs overflow, and would go back in a heartbeat.

  • Cost: $20 per site per night, or $13.50 per night at the overflow
  • Amenities: A drop toilet at Black Springs, with nothing at the overflow
  • Style of camping permitted: 4WD access only, with small, light weight campers possibly suitable
  • Pet Friendly: No
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Online, via the SA Parks website
Black Springs Camp site 7

Black Springs camp site number 7; we stayed in the overflow

Cliff camping at Coffin Bay

We rated the overflow much higher, and its completely free

Nyroca Camp

If you want a different kind of camp, Nyroca Scout Camp is a great option. My folks found this whilst exploring around Coffin Bay, and recommended we spend a night. The kids loved this place, with heaps of massive swings, lots of trees to climb, a big recreation room, extremely (too much) friendly chooks running around and lots of grass.

We had a lot of fun here, and it broke up the coastal camping a bit as well, which is always nice.

  • Cost: $10 per adult per night, plus $5 for kids over 4
  • Amenities: Awesome showers, flushing toilets, a free washing machine, recreation room and heaps of swings for the kids
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: In season, in the communal pit
  • How to book: Online
Camped at Nyroca

Our great camp site at Nyroca Scout Camp

Massive swing at Camp Nyroca

Our kids loved the huge, and many swings

Greenly Beach

After seeing a heap of amazing comments about Greenly Beach, we were really keen to get there and spend a few nights. Unfortunately the weather was not on our side at all, and whilst we could have stayed a night we decided it wasn’t for us.

On a day with calm weather though, this place would be stunning.

  • Cost: $5 per night
  • Amenities: Nothing
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Book online on the Eyre Peninsula website
Greenly Beach

We were keen to stay at Greenly Beach, but the weather made it really unpleasant

Greenly Beach

It’s on the list for next time

Hall Bay

The Eyre Peninsula has lots of free camping opportunities, and we spent two nights at Hall Bay, near Horrocks Lookout. The views here are amazing, and if you make the trek down to the beach its one of the most beautiful that you’ll ever see.

We did get badly hammered by wind and super fine sand all through our outdoor kitchen on the second afternoon, but its a magic place when the weather is good.

  • Cost: Free
  • Amenities: None 
  • Style of camping permitted: All types, with 4WD’s having much more choice
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: No bookings; first come, best dressed
Camped at Hall Bay

Hall Bay is a great, free place to camp

Horrocks Lookout

The beach at Horrocks Lookout is incredible

Sheringa Beach

We didn’t camp at Sheringa Beach, but drove through and really liked it. The beach is quite rough and suitable for those wanting to surf or fish, not for young kids. There’s a number of places you can camp, and the scenery here was really quite spectacular.

  • Cost: $20 per vehicle per night
  • Amenities: Toilets and bins in the main camp site. Other sites have nothing
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Book online on the Eyre Peninsula website

Walkers Rock

Not far north of Elliston lies Walkers Rock, which is a basic camp ground with very badly marked out areas, and you need to book online. We spent two nights here, and eventually fell in love with the beaches around it, and Elliston itself (which is stunning).

  • Cost: $20 per vehicle per night
  • Amenities: Flushing toilet and cold shower, along with rubbish bins
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: Online, and you need to pick the correct camp site for where you are staying
Walkers Rock Camp ground

Our camp site at Walkers Rock near Elliston

Elliston town

Elliston is a stunning part of the world

Near Point Labatt

If you are keen on seeing sea lions, Point Labatt is the place to go. We thoroughly enjoyed watching them for a number of hours, and then headed out to camp at a spot nearby, which looked pretty good.

Unfortunately it was super hot, the ants were out of control and as soon as we had water out we had bee’s hanging around during the daylight hours. We got up the next morning and bailed fairly early with the ants getting too much, but it was free!

  • Cost: Free
  • Amenities: Nothing 
  • Style of camping permitted: All types
  • Pet Friendly: Yes
  • Fires permitted: Yes, in season
  • How to book: No booking; first come, best dressed
Camped on Baird Bay near Point Labatt

Our camp site overlooking Baird Bay (it was nice, but we left early!)

Big and small seals

The highlight was seeing the seals at Point Labatt though!

Hopefully this has been helpful, and we wish you the very best on your Eyre Peninsula Camping adventures. It’s truly a magic part of the country, and one you shouldn’t miss.

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2 comments… add one
  • Terry Everson January 24, 2023, 1:48 PM

    Lipson Cove is another nice spot.

  • Aaron Schubert January 24, 2023, 5:32 PM

    Hey Terry,

    Cheers for the recommendation. I think we must have missed this; something for next time!

    Take care
    Aaron

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